top header
top header
top header

Pruning Techniques For Common Vegetables

Pruning or simple trimming is the latest technology applied to horticultural crops to increase the quality of fruits and and vine crops. Reducing the number of branches and vines provides the maximum utilization of nutrient elements by the plant which supports the production of quality and vigorous fruits. The excess branches and vines are only an addition to the plants’ burden, since they utilized more nutrients and not giving advantage in terms of fruit quality.

To produce more quality fruits, those excess branches and vines should be removed. They’re just simply excess plant parts and have no economic value to gardeners.

Benefits Derived in Pruning

1) Minimize sunlight competition, nutrients, and water – These three factors when limited to the plants growth reduces its productivity. Pruning helps them to be available to the plants because some unnecessary plant parts have been removed.

2) Minimizes insect pests and diseases occurrence – When you prune your plants, they are exposed to total sunlight, therefore, reduces pests and diseases attack. Pests and diseases don’t stay long in hot condition as compared to shady place.

3) Minimize spraying – When you don’t spray, you minimize your production cost and at the same time helps for a chemical – free environment.

4) Improve quality of fruits – Pruned plants have bigger fruit size and have a better price in the market.

Pruning Techniques of Common Vegetables

• Upo, Patola and Ampalaya

1) 14 – 15 Days after transplanting, remove lateral vines including flowers and fruits from the 1st – 12th node (at least one meter from the plant base.

2) Allow to fruits on the 13th node up (this is the fruiting zone).

3) Do follow-up pruning and remove those curly leaves.

• Watermelon

1) Cut the terminal bud after the 4th node allowing 4 late5ral vines to develop.

2) Remove secondary lateral vines including flowers and fruits up to the 9th node.

3) Allow to develop fruits on the 10th node up

4) Remove lateral vines not the leaves that may crop up below the 9th node.

5) Allow 1 fruit each lateral vine to develop a total of 4 fruits for the 4 lateral vines.

• Honeydew and Muskmelon (without trellis)

1) Cut the terminal buds the same as in watermelon.

2) Remove sec0ondary lateral vines including flowers and fruits up to the 5th node.

3) Allow to develop fruits on the 6th node up.

4) Maintain 3 – 4 fruits per plant.

• Honeydew and Muskmelon (with trellis)

1) Remove lateral vines including flowers and fruits from the 1st node – 9th node.

2) Allow to develop fruits between the 10th up to the 20th node (fruiting zone).

3) Maintain two fruits per plant.

• Squash

1) Remove all the lateral vines including fruits and flowers from the 1st up to the 5th node.

2) Allow to develop fruits on the 6th node up

3) Remove leaves below the 6th node once the lateral vines are fully develop.

4) Don’t allow any lateral vines to develop below the 6th node. Follow-up pruning should be observed always.

• Cucumber

1) Remove lateral vines including flowers and fruits up to the 5th node.

2) Allow to develop fruits on the 6th node up.

3) In every secondary vines allow twp fruits to develop then cut the tip after the 3rd node.

• Eggplant, Pepper and Tomato

1) Remove all the auxiliary buds up to the pork.

2) Above the pork allow to develop 4 branches and remove the leaves below the pork.

3) After fruiting stage remove the leaves below the pork.

4) Don’t allow branches to develop below the pork area.

Always prune your vegetables to get a better quality you desired.

Leave a Reply

Request Call Back

You will be contacted within 24-48 business hours or you can contact us on 08102932269, 08183909779 for further clarifications.

CAPTCHA
Please wait...